Interesting Tidbits (Adam)

  • John Gruber has an interesting article on the economics of being a one-man software shop, “The Life.” He uses the case of Brent Simmons and NetNewsWire to shed light on why the life of a small software development shop is so hard.
  • Jeff Veen of Adaptive Path has announced “MeasureMap,” a new blog-focused log analysis program. I currently use AWStats, and its not great for blogs. It doesn’t help me see where links come from and go, it doesn’t give me good indications of spike or trends or context. So I look forward to seeing MeasureMap.
  • Bruce Schneier pointed to a lovely story about a French fraudster with panache:

    During the final call he asked for the names of her six richest customers. When she revealed them, he said that one was involved in financing terrorism and was about to withdraw a large sum.

    Gilbert then demanded all the cash at the bank so he could mark the notes with microchips and keep track of the terrorist. A total of €358,000 was to be put in an briefcase and slipped under the door of a brasserie lavatory. The manager did as she was told. The money disappeared.

  • Tom Ptacek explains how Sarbox interacts with security vulnerability announcements in “Today’s Contribution To ‘Vulnerability Science.’

  • Ian Grigg points out that Ben Laurie is blogging at Links.org. Ben is taking issue with Kim Cameron’s “Laws of Identity.” It should be interesting to watch.

One thought on “Interesting Tidbits (Adam)

  1. What happens when you don’t do due diligence…

    A story doing the rounds (, ) shows how money laundering is now being used to open up security in banks that don’t do DD. The power of the money laundering bureaucrats is now so unquestioned that mere mention of it and a plausible pretence at it allows…

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