New School Reviews

Don Morrill, IT Toolbox:

If you want to read a book that will have an influence on your information security career, or if you just want to read something that points out that we do need to do information security differently, then you need to go pick up a copy of “The new school of information security” by Adam Shostack and Andrew Stewart.

Amateurs Study Cryptography; Professionals Study Economics:

Adam and his co-author have produced a readable, compact tour of the information security field as it stands today – or perhaps as it lies in its crib. What we know intuitively the authors bring forward thoughtfully in their analysis of the information security industry: it is struggling to keep up with the defects in online communication, data storage, and business processes.

La industria de la seguridad: Vende desde la inseguridad:

Revisando el capítulo 2 titulado “The security industry”, del libro de SHOSTACK y STEWART publicado por Addison Wesley en 2008 denominado The New School of Information Security, se presentan de manera clara y abierta la forma como la industria se da a la tarea de vender la distinción de seguridad de la información, tanto en el tema de productos y servicios, así como en buenas prácticas, listas de chequeo y estándares.

It makes me strangely happy to have our first non-English review.

Finally, Keith Shaw at Network World interviewed me, the podcast is “Why security is failing.”

5 thoughts on “New School Reviews

  1. I think you guys did some good work on the book. I just finished it the other day myself. I was happy to recognize the names of a couple of the reviewers, and I could picture them making some of the comments when a ‘reviewer’ was referred to in the text. I think the book will be an eye-opener for a lot of folks in the professional world. I think I am somewhat lucky in the fact that most systems administrators and security people I know already think in the “New School”. I think this is perhaps due to the fact most of us are in Academia.
    Also, I liked the style of End Notes. This is the first book in a very long time that I have actually read through the end notes instead of just referring back to them at some other point.

  2. Bad Rob Sama, Bad. Now the theme song is in my head. I’m going to have to go watch The Banana Splits on Youtube just to counter the juju.

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