Emergent Effects of Restrictions on Teenage Drivers

For more than a decade, California and other states have kept their newest teen drivers on a tight leash, restricting the hours when they can get behind the wheel and whom they can bring along as passengers. Public officials were confident that their get-tough policies were saving lives.

Now, though, a nationwide analysis of crash data suggests that the restrictions may have backfired: While the number of fatal crashes among 16- and 17-year-old drivers has fallen, deadly accidents among 18-to-19-year-olds have risen by an almost equal amount. In effect, experts say, the programs that dole out driving privileges in stages, however well-intentioned, have merely shifted the ranks of inexperienced drivers from younger to older teens.

“The unintended consequences of these laws have not been well-examined,” said Mike Males, a senior researcher at the Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice in San Francisco, who was not involved in the study, published in Wednesday’s edition of the Journal of the American Medical Assn. “It’s a pretty compelling study.” (“Teen driver restrictions a mixed bag“)

As Princess Leia once said, “The more you tighten your grip, the more teenagers will slip through your fingers.”

California gets a strengthened Breach Notification Law

Governor Brown of California has signed a strengthened breach notification bill, which amends Sections 1798.29 and 1798.82 of the California Civil Code in important ways. Previous versions had been repeatedly vetoed by Arnold Schwarzenegger.

As described[.DOC] by its sponsor’s office, this law:

  • Establishes standard, core content — such as the type of information breached, time of breach, and toll-free telephone numbers and addresses of the major credit reporting agencies — for security breach notices in California;
  • Requires public agencies, businesses, and persons subject to California’s security breach notification law, if more than 500 California residents are affected by a single breach, to send an electronic copy of the breach notification to the Attorney General; and,
  • Requires public agencies, businesses and persons subject to California’s security breach notification law, if they are utilizing the substitute notice provisions in current law, to also provide that notification to the Office of Information Security or the Office of Privacy Protection, as applicable.
  • senatorsimitian.com

    This makes California the fifteenth (!) state with a central notification provision on the books, the others being: Hawaii, Iowa, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New Hampshire, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Vermont, Virginia, West Virginia, Wisconsin, and Wyoming. Puerto Rico also has such a requirement. Ibid.

    I’m looking forward to the resulting information, and I hope California’s Attorney General has the good sense to post all received notification letters. This will undoubtedly be easier for the state than dealing with the inevitable FOIA requests, and serves the public interest by increasing transparency.