Getting Ready for a Launch

I’m getting ready for to announce a new project that I’ve been working on for quite a while.

As I get ready, I was talking to friends in PR and marketing, and they were shocked and appalled that I don’t have a mailing list. It was a little like telling people in security that you don’t fuzz your code.

Now, I don’t know a lot about marketing, but I do know that look which implies table stakes. So I’ve set up a mailing list. I’ve cleverly named it “Adam Shostack’s New Thing.” It’ll be the first place to hear about the new things I’m creating — books, games or anything else.

People who sign up will be the first to hear my news.

[Update: Some people are asking why I don’t just use Twitter or blogs? I plan to, but there are people who’d like more concentrated news in their inbox. Cool. I can help them. And much as I love Twitter, it’s easy for a tweet to be lost, and easy to fall into the trap of retweeting yourself every hour to overcome that. That’s annoying to your followers who see you repeating yourself.]

Please vote for the social security blogger awards!

Alan Shimmy has the nominations for the 2014 Social Security bloggers award!

New School has been nominated for most entertaining, while Emergent Chaos has been nominated for best representing the security industry and the hall of fame.

Now, I have no idea what it means that Emergent Chaos would represent the security industry. I’m hopeful that it’s intended as a complement.

What’s Copyright, Doc?

I blogged yesterday about all the new works that have entered the public domain as their copyright expired in the United States. If you missed it, that’s because exactly nothing entered the public domain yesterday.

Read more — but only commentary, because there’s no newly free work — at “What Could Have Entered the Public Domain on January 1, 2014?

It’s near-impossible to see how our insanely long copyright terms, or their never-ending extensions encourage Dr. Seuss, Ayn Rand, Jack Kerouac or Ian Fleming to keep producing new work. Those authors have been richly rewarded for their work. But it’s easy to see how keeping those works under copyright reduces creative re-use of our collective cultural heritage.