Boyd Video: Patterns of Conflict

John Boyd’s ideas have had a deep impact on the world. He created the concept of the OODA Loop, and talked about the importance of speed (“getting inside your opponent’s loop”) and orientation, and how we determine what’s important.

A lot of people who know about the work of John Boyd also know that he rarely took the time to write. His work was constantly evolving, and for many years, the work existed as scanned photocopies of acetate presentation slides.

In 2005, Robert Coram published a book (which I reviewed here and in that review, I said:

His writings are there to support a presentation; many of them don’t stand well on their own. Other writers present his ideas better than he did. But they don’t think with the intensity, creativity, or rigor that he brought to his work.

I wasn’t aware that there was video of him presenting, but Jasonmbro has uploaded approximately 5 hours of Boyd presenting his Patterns of Conflict briefing. The audio is not great, but it’s not unusable. There’s an easy to read version of that slide collection here. (Those slides are a little later than the video, and so may not line up perfectly.)

An Infosec lesson from the “Worst Play Call Ever”

It didn’t take long for the Seahawk’s game-losing pass to get a label.


But as Ed Felten explains, there’s actually some logic to it, and one of his commenters (Chris) points out that Marshawn Lynch scored in only one of his 5 runs from the one yard line this season. So, perhaps in a game in which the Patriots had no interceptions, it was worth the extra play before the clock ran out.

We can all see the outcome, and we judge, post-facto, the decision on that.

Worst play call ever

In security, we almost never see an outcome so closely tied to a decision. As Jay Jacobs has pointed out, we live in a wicked environment. Unfortunately, we’re quick to snap to judgement when we see a bad outcome. That makes learning harder. Also, we don’t usually get a chance to see the logic behind a play and assess it.

If only we had a way to shorten those feedback loops, then maybe we could assess what the worst play call in infosec might be.

And in fact, despite my use of snarky linkage, I don’t think we know enough to judge Sony or ChoicePoint. The decisions made by Spaltro at Sony are not unusual. We hear them all the time in security. The outcome at Sony is highly visible, but is it the norm, or is it an outlier? I don’t think we know enough to know the answer.

Hindsight is 20/20 in football. It’s easy to focus in on a single decision. But the lesson from Moneyball, and the lesson from Pete Carroll is Really, with no second thoughts or hesitation in that at all.” He has a system, and it got the Seahawks to the very final seconds of the game. And then.

One day, we’ll be able to tell management “our systems worked, and we hit really bad luck.”

[Please keep comments civil, like you always do here.]