Security Lessons from Healthcare.gov

There’s a great “long read” at CIO, “6 Software Development Lessons From Healthcare.gov’s Failed Launch.” It opens:

This article tries to go further than the typical coverage of Healthcare.gov. The amazing thing about this story isn’t the failure. That was fairly obvious. No, the strange thing is the manner in which often conflicting information is coming out. Writing this piece requires some archeology: Going over facts and looking for inconsistencies to assemble the best information about what’s happened and pinpoint six lessons we might learn from it.

There’s a lot there, and I liked it even before lesson 6 (“Threat Modeling Matters”). Open analysis is generally better.

There’s a question of why this has to be done by someone like Matthew Heusser. No disrespect is intended, but why isn’t Healthcare.gov performing these analyses and sharing them? Part of the problem is that we live in an “outrage world” where it’s easier to point fingers and giggle in 140 characters and hurt people’s lives or careers than it is to make a positive contribution.

It would be great to see project analyses and attempts to learn from more projects that go sideways. But it would also be great to see these for security failures. As I asked in “What Happened At OPM,” we have these major hacks, and we learn nothing at all from them. (Or worse, we learn bad lessons, such as “don’t go looking for breaches.”)

The definition of insanity is doing the same thing over and over and hoping for different results. (Which may includes asking the same question or writing the same blog post over and over, which is why I’m starting a company to improve security effectiveness.)

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