Phishing and Clearances

Apparently, the CISO of US Homeland Security, a Paul Beckman, said that:

“Someone who fails every single phishing campaign in the world should not be holding a TS SCI [top secret, sensitive compartmentalized information—the highest level of security clearance] with the federal government” (Paul Beckman, quoted in Ars technica)

Now, I’m sure being in the government and trying to defend against phishing attacks is a hard problem, and I don’t want to ignore that real frustration. At the same time, GAO found that the government is having trouble hiring cybersecurity experts, and that was before the SF-86 leak.

Removing people’s clearances is one repsonse. It’s not clear from the text if these are phishing (strictly defined, an attempt to get usernames and passwords), or malware attached to the emails.

In each case, there are other fixes. The first would be multi-factor authentication for government logins. This was the subject of a push, and if agencies aren’t at 100%, maybe getting there is better than punitive action. Another fix could be to use an email client which makes seeing phishing emails easier. For example, an email client could display the RFC-822 sender address (eg, “<account.management@gmail.com>” for any email address that that email client hasn’t sent email to, rather than the friendly text. They could provide password management software with built-in anti-phishing (checking the domain before submitting the password. They could, I presume, do other things which minimize the request on the human being.

When Rob Reeder, Ellen Cram Kowalczyk and I created the “NEAT” guidance for usable security, we didn’t make “Necessary” first just because the acronym is neater that way, we put it first because the poor person is usually overwhelmed, and they deserve to have software make the decisions that software can make. Angela Sasse called this the ‘compliance budget,’ and it’s not a departmental budget, it’s a human one. My understanding is that those who work for the government already have enough things drawing on that budget. Making people anxious that they’ll lose their clearance and have to take a higher-paying private sector job should not be one of them.