RSA Planning

Have a survival kit: ricola, Purell, gatorade, advil and antacids can be brought or bought on site.

Favorite talk (not by me): I look forward to Sounil Yu’s talk on “Understanding the Security Vendor Landscape Using the Cyber Defense Matrix.” I’ve seen an earlier version of this, and like the model he’s building a great deal.

Favorite talk I’m giving: “Securing the ‘Weakest Link’.”

A lot of guides, like this one, are not very comprehensive or strategic. John Masserini’s A CISO’s Guide to RSA Conference 2016 is a very solid overview if you’re new, or not getting good value from a conference.

While you’re there, keep notes for a trip report. Sending a trip report helps you remember what happened, helps your boss understand why they spent the money, and helps justify your next trip. I like trip reports that start with a summary, go directly to action items, then a a list of planned meetings and notes on them, followed by detailed and organized notes.

Also while you’re there, remember it’s infosec, and drama is common. Remember the drama triangle and how to avoid it.

Secure Code is Hard, Let’s Make it Harder!

I was confused about why Dan Kaminsky would say CVE-2015-7547 (a bug in glbc’s DNS handling) creates network attack surface for sudo. Chris Rohlf kindly sorted me out by mentioning that there’s now a -host option to sudo, of which I was unaware.

I had not looked at sudo in depth for probably 20 years, and I’m shocked to discover that it has a -e option to invoke an editor, a -p option to process format string bugs, and a -a to allow the invoker to select authentication type(?!?!)

It’s now been a fully twenty years that I’ve been professionally involved in analyzing source code. (These Security Code Review Guidelines were obviously not started in August.) We know that all code has bugs, and more code is strongly correlated with more bugs. I first saw this in the intro to the first edition of Cheswick and Bellovin. I feel a little bit like yelling you kids get off my lawn, but really, the unix philosophy of “do one thing well” was successful for a reason. The goal of sudo is to let the user go through a privilege boundary. It should be insanely simple. [Updated to add, Justin Cormack mentions that OpenBSD went from sudo to doas on this basis.]

It’s not. Not that ssh is simple either, but it isolates complexity, and helps us model attack surface more simply.

Some of the new options make sense, and support security feature sets not present previously. Some are just dumb.

As I wrote this, Dan popped up to say that it also parses /etc/hostname to help it log. Again, do one thing well. Syslog should know what host it’s on, what host it’s transmitting from, and what host its receiving from.

It’s very, very hard to make code secure. When we add in insane options to code, we make it even harder. Sometimes, other people ask us to make the code less secure, and while I’ve already said what I want to say about the FBI asking Apple to fix their mistake by writing new code, this is another example of shooting ourselves in our feet.

Please stop making it harder.

[Update: related “Not-quite-so-broken TLS: lessons in re-engineering a security protocol specification and implementation,” abstracted by the morning paper” which examines an approach to re-implementing TLS, thanks to Steve Bellovin for the pointer.]

Sneak peeks at my new startup at RSA

Confusion

Many executives have been trying to solve the problem of connecting security to the business, and we’re excited about what we’re building to serve this important and unmet need. If you present security with an image like the one above, we may be able to help.

My new startup is getting ready to show our product to friends at RSA. We’re building tools for enterprise leaders to manage their security portfolios. What does that mean? By analogy, if you talk to a financial advisor, they have tools to help you see your total financial picture: assets and debts. They’ll help you break out assets into long term (like a home) or liquid investments (like stocks and bonds) and then further contextualize each as part of your portfolio. There hasn’t been an easy way to model and manage a portfolio of control investments, and we’re building the first.

If you’re interested, we have a few slots remaining for meetings in our suite at RSA! Drop me a line at [first]@[last].org, in a comment or reach out over linkedin.

Kale Caesar

According to the CBC: “McDonald’s kale salad has more calories than a Double Big Mac

NewImage

In a quest to reinvent its image, McDonald’s is on a health kick. But some of its nutrient-enhanced meals are actually comparable to junk food, say some health experts.

One of new kale salads has more calories, fat and sodium than a Double Big Mac.

Apparently, McDonalds is there not to braise kale, but to bury it in cheese and mayonnaise. And while that’s likely mighty tasty, it’s not healthy.

At a short-term level, this looks like good product management. Execs want salads on the menu? Someone’s being measured on sales of new salads, and loading them up with tasty, tasty fats. It’s effective at associating a desirable property of salad with the product.

Longer term, not so much. It breeds cynicism. It undercuts the ability of McDonalds to ever change its image, or to convince people that its food might be a healthy choice.

Superbowls

This is a superb owl, but its feathers are ruffled.Superbowl It is certainly not a metaphor.

Speaking of ruffled feathers, apparently there’s a kerfuffle about Super Bowl 1, where the only extant tape is in private hands, and there’s conflict over what to do with it.

One aspect I haven’t seen covered is that 50 years ago, the tape pre-dates the Bern convention and thus is in the era of requiring copyright notice (and registration.) Was the NFL properly copyrighting its game video back then? If not, does that mean that Mr. Haupt can legally do what he wants, and is chilled by for the threat that Big Football would simply throw lawyers at him until he gives up?

Such threats, at odds with our legally guaranteed right to a speedy trial certainly generate a climate in which large organizations, often governmental ones, can use protracted uncertainty as a weapon against oversight or control. Consider if you will the decade-long, Kafka-esque ordeal of Ms Rahinah Ibrahim, who was on the No Fly list due to a mistake. Consider the emotional and personal cost of not being able to either enter the US, or achieve a sense of closure.

Such a lack of oversight is certainly impacting the people of Flint, Michigan. As Larry Rosenthal points out (first comment), even if, sometime down the line the people of Flint win their case, the doubtless slow and extended trials may grind fine, but wouldn’t it be better if we had a justice system that could deliver justice a little faster?

Anyway, what a superb owl that is.