Secure Code is Hard, Let’s Make it Harder!

I was confused about why Dan Kaminsky would say CVE-2015-7547 (a bug in glbc’s DNS handling) creates network attack surface for sudo. Chris Rohlf kindly sorted me out by mentioning that there’s now a -host option to sudo, of which I was unaware.

I had not looked at sudo in depth for probably 20 years, and I’m shocked to discover that it has a -e option to invoke an editor, a -p option to process format string bugs, and a -a to allow the invoker to select authentication type(?!?!)

It’s now been a fully twenty years that I’ve been professionally involved in analyzing source code. (These Security Code Review Guidelines were obviously not started in August.) We know that all code has bugs, and more code is strongly correlated with more bugs. I first saw this in the intro to the first edition of Cheswick and Bellovin. I feel a little bit like yelling you kids get off my lawn, but really, the unix philosophy of “do one thing well” was successful for a reason. The goal of sudo is to let the user go through a privilege boundary. It should be insanely simple. [Updated to add, Justin Cormack mentions that OpenBSD went from sudo to doas on this basis.]

It’s not. Not that ssh is simple either, but it isolates complexity, and helps us model attack surface more simply.

Some of the new options make sense, and support security feature sets not present previously. Some are just dumb.

As I wrote this, Dan popped up to say that it also parses /etc/hostname to help it log. Again, do one thing well. Syslog should know what host it’s on, what host it’s transmitting from, and what host its receiving from.

It’s very, very hard to make code secure. When we add in insane options to code, we make it even harder. Sometimes, other people ask us to make the code less secure, and while I’ve already said what I want to say about the FBI asking Apple to fix their mistake by writing new code, this is another example of shooting ourselves in our feet.

Please stop making it harder.

[Update: related “Not-quite-so-broken TLS: lessons in re-engineering a security protocol specification and implementation,” abstracted by the morning paper” which examines an approach to re-implementing TLS, thanks to Steve Bellovin for the pointer.]

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