CERT, Tor, and Disclosure Coordination

There’s been a lot said in security circles about a talk on Tor being pulled from Blackhat. (Tor’s comments are also worth noting.) While that story is interesting, I think the bigger story is the lack of infrastructure for disclosure coordination.

Coordinating information about vulnerabilities is a socially important function. Coordination makes it possible for software creators to create patches and distribute them so that those with the software can most easily protect themselves.

In fact, the function is so important that it was part of why CERT was founded to: “coordinate response to internet security incidents.” Now, incidents has always been more than just vulnerabilities, but vulnerability coordination was a big part of what CERT did.

The trouble is, it’s not a big part anymore. [See below for a clarification added August 21.] Now “The CERT Division works closely with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to meet mutually set goals in areas such as data collection and mining, statistics and trend analysis, computer and network security, incident management, insider threat, software assurance, and more.” (Same “about” link as before.)

This isn’t the first time that I’ve heard about an issue where CERT wasn’t able to coordinate disclosure. I want to be clear, I’m not critiquing CERT or their funders here. They’ve set priorities and strategies in a way that makes sense to them, and as far as I know, there’s been precious little pressure to have a vuln coordination function.

It’s time we as a security community talk about the infrastructure, not as a flamewar over coordination/responsibility/don’t blow your 0day, but rather, for those who would like to coordinate, how should they do so?

Heartbleed is an example of what can happen with an interesting vulnerability and incomplete coordination. (Thanks to David Mortman for pointing that out in reviewing a draft.) Systems administrators woke up Monday morning to incomplete information, a marketing campaign, and a slew of packages that hadn’t been updated.


Disclosure coordination is hard to do. There’s a lot of project management and cross-organizational collaboration. Doing that work requires a special mix of patience and urgency, along with an unusual mix of technical skill with diplomatic communication. Those requirements mean that the people who do the work are rare and expensive. What’s more, it’s helpful to have these people seated at a relatively neutral party. (In the age of governments flooding money into cyberwar, it’s not clear if there are any truly neutral parties available. Some disclosure coordination is managed by big companies with a stake in the issue, which is helpful, but it’s hard for researchers to predict and depend apon.) These issues are magnified because those who are great at vulnerability research rarely spend time to develop those skills, and so an intermediary is even more valuable.

Even setting that aside, is there anyone who’s stepping up to the plate to help researchers effectively coordinate and manage disclosure?

[Update: I had a good conversation with some people at CERT/CC, in which I learned that they still do coordination work, especially in cases where the vendor is dealing with an issue for the first time, the issue is multi-vendor, or where there's a conflict between vendor and researcher. The best way to do that is via their vulnerability reporting form, but if things don't work, you can also email cert@cert.org or call their hotline (the number is on their contact us page.]

Mail Chaos

The mail system I’ve been using for the last 19 years is experiencing what one might call an accumulation of chaos, and so I’m migrating to a new domain, shostack.org.

You can email me at my firstname@shostack.org, and my web site is now at http://adam.shostack.org

I am sorry for any inconvenience this may cause.

[Update: A number of folks have asked what happened. The simple answer is technical debt associated with maintaining servers in the basement. No drama, just life.]

Seattle event: Ada’s Books

Shostack threat modeling Adas

For Star Wars day, I’m happy to share this event poster for my talk at Ada’s Books in Seattle
Technical Presentation: Adam Shostack shares Threat Modeling Lessons with Star Wars.

This will be a less technical talk with plenty of discussion and interactivity, drawing on some of the content from “Security Lessons from Star Wars,” adapted for a more general audience.

Virtual assistant services?

I’m getting ready to announce an East coast book tour. In planning my Silicon Valley tour, I learned that between scheduling, getting the details needed out, making sure I knew where I was sleeping, there was a large amount of administrative work involved. So I’d like to hire someone to take care of all that for me next time.

I think the tasks will include:

  • Engage with companies/venues interested in having me speak to work through scheduling & logistics, including ordering books
  • Scheduling (including travel time, setup, speaking, signing)
  • Travel coordination including hotels & trains

Do you have recommendations for a virtual assistant service that you’ve used for something at this level of complexity?

Alternately, convince me that I want a specialized book tour operator? My experience in Silicon Valley was that most venues were companies, and many were good enough to buy the books for their employees. So I don’t think I need someone specialized.

L’Academie Gawker

Via Poynter, we learn that the word “massive” has been banned on Gawker.

We want to sound like regular adult human beings, not Buzzfeed writers or Reddit commenters,” new Gawker Editor Max Read says in a memo to the publication’s writers. Words like “epic,” “pwn” and “derp” are no longer welcome on the site. Read also says the word “massive” is “never to appear on the website Gawker dot com.”

The desire to sound like regular human beings is admirable, and Mr. Read is correct when he says that jokes made using strikethrough are generally not worth saving.

However, he seems to fall into a trap of believing that there is an hierarchy of language goodness which is removed from our social hierarchies. We’re not the French, with L’Acadamie française to define correct language, and to be ignored by Le Frenchmen dans on le weekends.

The observable reality is that language evolves as a result of a variety of pressures or opportunities. That is, language is emergent, not decreed. There is no authority who gets to declare what words a community uses (outside of NewSpeak, and even in Orwell’s world, normal people don’t use NewSpeak daily, because the words decreed by Big Brother didn’t serve their needs. Real language is inevitably chaotic and messy.

This is a massive pile of derp, and an epic mistake on Gawker’s part.

[Updated to add a strikethrough joke.]

Threat Modeling: Designing for Security

Threat modeling book 300

I am super-excited to announce that my new book, Threat Modeling: Designing for Security (Wiley, 2014) is now available wherever fine books are sold!

The official description:

If you’re a software developer, systems manager, or security professional, this book will show you how to use threat modeling in the security development lifecycle and the overall software and systems design processes. Author and security expert Adam Shostack puts his considerable expertise to work in this book that, unlike any other, details the process of building improved security into the design of software, computer services, and systems — from the very beginning.

  • Find and fix security issues before they hurt you or your customers
  • Learn to use practical and actionable tools, techniques, and approaches for software developers, IT professionals, and security enthusiasts
  • Explore the nuances of software-centric threat modeling and discover its application to software and systems during the build phase and beyond
  • Apply threat modeling to improve security when managing complex systems (or even simple ones!)
  • Manage potential threats using a structured, methodical framework
  • Discover and discern evolving security threats
  • Use specific, actionable advice regardless of software type, operating system, or program approaches and techniques validated and proven to be effective at Microsoft and other top IT companies

Threat Modeling: Designing for Security is full of actionable, tested advice for software developers, systems architects and managers, and security professionals. From the very first chapter, it teaches the reader how to threat model. That is, how to use models to predict and prevent problems, even before you’ve started coding.

Threat Modeling: Designing for Security is jargon-free, accessible, and provides proven frameworks that are designed to integrate into real projects that need to ship on tight schedules.

For more information, I’ve set up a small book website: threatmodelingbook.com.

Availability

Amazon has Kindle edition, and is saying that the paperback will ship in “9-11 days.” I believe that’s startup issues in getting the books to and through the warehousing system, but don’t know details. I will be having a book signing at RSA, Wednesday at 11 AM in Moscone South. (iCal reminder.)

Future blogging

In light of me celebrating the joyous chaos of what to put on which blog, but more importantly, not wanting readers to have to subscribe to three blogs, I’ll be blogging about threat modeling over on the New School blog.

On Bitcoin

There’s an absolutely fascinating interview with Adam Back: “Let’s Talk Bitcoin Adam Back interview.”

For those of you who don’t know Adam, he created Hashcash, which is at the core of Bitcoin proof of work.

Two elements I’d like to call attention to in particular are:
First, there’s an interesting contrast between Adam’s opinions and Glenn Flieshman’s opinions in “On the Matter of Why Bitcoin Matters.” In particular, Glenn seems to think that transaction dispute should be in the protocol, and Adam thinks it should be layered on in some way. (Near as I can tell, Glenn is a very smart journalist, but he’s not a protocol designer.)

Secondly, Adam discusses the ways in which a really smart fellow, deeply steeped in the underlying technologies, can fail to see how all the elements of Bitcoin happened to combine into a real ecash system. Like Adam, I was focused on properties other systems have and Bitcoin does not, and so was unexcited by it. There’s an interesting lesson in humility there for me.

This is also interesting “How the Bitcoin protocol works.”

Getting Ready for a Launch

I’m getting ready for to announce a new project that I’ve been working on for quite a while.

As I get ready, I was talking to friends in PR and marketing, and they were shocked and appalled that I don’t have a mailing list. It was a little like telling people in security that you don’t fuzz your code.

Now, I don’t know a lot about marketing, but I do know that look which implies table stakes. So I’ve set up a mailing list. I’ve cleverly named it “Adam Shostack’s New Thing.” It’ll be the first place to hear about the new things I’m creating — books, games or anything else.

People who sign up will be the first to hear my news.

[Update: Some people are asking why I don't just use Twitter or blogs? I plan to, but there are people who'd like more concentrated news in their inbox. Cool. I can help them. And much as I love Twitter, it's easy for a tweet to be lost, and easy to fall into the trap of retweeting yourself every hour to overcome that. That's annoying to your followers who see you repeating yourself.]

Please vote for the social security blogger awards!

Alan Shimmy has the nominations for the 2014 Social Security bloggers award!

New School has been nominated for most entertaining, while Emergent Chaos has been nominated for best representing the security industry and the hall of fame.

Now, I have no idea what it means that Emergent Chaos would represent the security industry. I’m hopeful that it’s intended as a complement.

What’s Copyright, Doc?

I blogged yesterday about all the new works that have entered the public domain as their copyright expired in the United States. If you missed it, that’s because exactly nothing entered the public domain yesterday.

Read more — but only commentary, because there’s no newly free work — at “What Could Have Entered the Public Domain on January 1, 2014?

It’s near-impossible to see how our insanely long copyright terms, or their never-ending extensions encourage Dr. Seuss, Ayn Rand, Jack Kerouac or Ian Fleming to keep producing new work. Those authors have been richly rewarded for their work. But it’s easy to see how keeping those works under copyright reduces creative re-use of our collective cultural heritage.