Nothing to see here, move along!

A reminder, this blog has moved! If you’re seeing this in your RSS, you should take a second to update your feed.

From now on, I’ll be posting at Adam Shostack and Friends/. If you read the site via RSS, please take a moment to update your feed to https://adam.shostack.org/blog/feed/. Oh, and everyone who’s been part of the jazz combo has an account over at the new blog, and I expect a new Mordaxus post any day.

If there’s too much content here (there?) and you’d like a lower volume set of updates on what Adam is doing, Adam’s New Thing gets only a few messages a year, guaranteed.

The Unanimous Declaration of the Thirteen United States of America

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In CONGRESS, July 4, 1776

The unanimous Declaration of the thirteen united States of America,

When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature’s God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. –That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed, –That whenever any Form of Government becomes destructive of these ends, it is the Right of the People to alter or to abolish it, and to institute new Government, laying its foundation on such principles and organizing its powers in such form, as to them shall seem most likely to effect their Safety and Happiness. Prudence, indeed, will dictate that Governments long established should not be changed for light and transient causes; and accordingly all experience hath shewn, that mankind are more disposed to suffer, while evils are sufferable, than to right themselves by abolishing the forms to which they are accustomed. But when a long train of abuses and usurpations, pursuing invariably the same Object evinces a design to reduce them under absolute Despotism, it is their right, it is their duty, to throw off such Government, and to provide new Guards for their future security. —Such has been the patient sufferance of these Colonies; and such is now the necessity which constrains them to alter their former Systems of Government. The history of the present King of Great Britain [George III] is a history of repeated injuries and usurpations, all having in direct object the establishment of an absolute Tyranny over these States. To prove this, let Facts be submitted to a candid world.

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RSA: Time for some cryptographic dogfood

One of the most effective ways to improve your software is to use it early and often.  This used to be called eating your own dogfood, which is far more evocative than the alternatives. The key is that you use the software you’re building. If it doesn’t taste good to you, it’s probably not customer-ready.  And so this week at RSA, I think more people should be eating the security community’s cryptographic dogfood.

As I evangelize the use of crypto to meet up at RSA, I’ve encountered many problems, such as choice of tool, availability of tool across a set of mobile platforms, cost of entry, etc.  Each of these is predictable, but with dogfooding — forcing myself to ask everyone why they want to use an easily wiretapped protocol — the issues stand out, and the companies that will be successful will start thinking about ways to overcome them.

So this week, as you prep for RSA, spend a few minutes to get some encrypted communications tool. The worst that can happen is you’re no more secure than you were before you read this post.

Emergent Planetary Detection via Gravitational Lensing



The CBC Quirks and Quarks podcast on “The 10% Solar System Solution” is a really interesting 9 minutes with Scott Gaudi on how to find small planets far away:

We have to rely on nature to give us the microlensing events. That means we can’t actually pick and choose which stars to look at, and we can’t actually pick what times to look at. So the best suited telescopes are those telescopes we can use at anytime that are located throughout the globe so that it’s dark somewhere. And so we use a lot of amateurs, actually we don’t use, we work with a lot of amatuers who have their own telescopes, relatively small telescopes, .3 meters, .4 meters in their backyard which they can use anytime they want. We call them up when we see a microlensing event happening that we think might be interesting and we ask them to get data for us. In fact in many cases they’ve gotten crucial data for us which has helped to discover a micro-lensing event.

What’s most amazing to me is how useful it is to have small parts loosely coupled, each pursuing their own interests. What emerges is, quoting Gaudi again:

One of our amatuers, Jenny McCormick who works in New Zealand and has her own observatory which she calls Farm Cove Observatory has said “It just goes to show: you can go out there you can work full time, you can be a mother and you can still find planets.”

Photo: The ESO Telescopes, by Paul Browne

People are People, Too!

Apparently, corporations and unions can now spend unlimited funds on campaign advertisements. I’m hopeful that soon the Supreme Court will recognize that people are people too, and have the same free speech rights as corporations.

Maybe, too, the Court will recognize that Congress may not limit the right of people to freely associate, and perhaps even pool their money in support of ideas or candidates they like.

Does it include a launchpad?

The New York Times is reporting that there’s a “Deep Discount on Space Shuttles ,” they’re down to $28.8 million. But even more exciting than getting one of the 3 surviving monstrosities is that the main engines are free:

As for the space shuttle main engines, those are now free. NASA advertised them in December 2008 for $400,000 to $800,000 each, but no one expressed interest. So now the engines are available, along with other shuttle artifacts, for the cost of transportation and handling.

So NASA, can I borrow the launchpad and send it to LEO?